Flight Records

For obvious reasons proper timekeeping is essential to keep track of the charges to be made for flights, and misinformation and mislaid flight cards causes some consternation in the Offic from time to time. To help avoid this problem please follow the sequence below:

  • First thing in the morning – set the numbering stamp. To do this:
    • push stamp half way in and press the little button to hold the inkpad in place.
    • Set the number for month, day, and flight number: e.g. 6 17 000 = June 17, Flight # 0 .
    • For 2 digit months use the last digit, i.e. October = 0, November = 1, December = 2
  • Make sure that the flight card has been filled out correctly. There are four types of flight cards being used:
    • WHITE - For members of YSA
    • YELLOW - These are used for introductory flight and will be filled out in the Flight Office only
    • GREEN - These are for SAC members from other clubs who have landed at YSA and who want a tow. The member # is 003 and Name is SAC. Check in the Flight Office to ensure that the tow has been prepaid. Also used for people of specific groups of visitors, i.e. Weekend Trips, Handicapped, etc. A list of eligible groups is kept in the Flight Office. Make sure the name of the Group and the group’s number is shown on the flight card. All tows for Special Groups should 3000’ unless advised otherwise by the Flight Office
    • BLUE - Used for people who have purchased a 5 flight package. All tows are to 2000; and maximum flight time is 30 minutes.
  • First ensure that the correct colour card is being used:
  • Ensure that the flight cards match the members and gliders waiting for take-off, with all relevant information entered. This includes:
    • Flight date and number
    • The name (first four letters + initial) and membership # of the front seat pilot
    • The name (first four letters + initial) and membership # of the rear seat pilot
    • Who the flight is to be charged to – the codes are shown on the flight card.
    • Last three letters of the glider and towplane’s registration
    • Tow height: Low tow = 1, 2000’ = 2; 3000’ = 3; 4000’ = 4, etc.
    • Take off time (HH/MM)
    • Group name and # (Green cards only)
    • This information is essential not only for processing the charges but also for keeping track of the aircraft times for the purpose of maintenance, inspections and reporting.
  • Advise the time-keeper when a flight takes off. The time is stamped on the flight card and the card is put in the “in flight” rack.
  • Advise the timekeeper when the flight lands. The timekeeper will then take the card form the “in-flight rack, note the landing time, CHECK THAT ALL REQUIRED INFORMATION IS ON THE CARD, and then place the completed card in the top right hand drawer. NOBODY EXCEPT THE LINE CHIEF OR FLIGHT OFFICE STAFF SHOULD HANDLE THESE CARDS AGAIN. (While take-offs are not generally missed by the time-keeper it is easy to miss a landing on a busy day when the flight line often obstructs a clear view of the landing area so the time-keeper will need some assistance with this).
  • During training, it is normal to give the student two consecutive flights. Two cards should be filled out and marked 1 and 2 in the top right-hand corner. This will remind you that when the landing time is being noted on card “1” that the aircraft cannot be assigned to another person because flight # 2 is to follow immediately.
  • If a member requests overtime, you should assess the potential demand on the aircraft being used. Wherever possible, overtime should be approved, so long as it does not cause an excessive waiting period for others. You should sign the flight card to approve the overtime request otherwise the pilot will be charged triple time for any flight time over 1 hour. Any flight for badge legs e.g. 5 hour attempts should be approved. However, if a member wants overtime for a personal flight in the 2-32 on a day when there is a heavy demand for intro flights, it should generally not be approved.
  • Do not be tempted to try and be Line chief and timekeeper yourself. There will always be somebody available – you’ve just got to ask them. However, make sure they know what they are supposed to do.