Classification

Class A Airspace is designated where an operational need exists to exclude VFR aircraft. All operations must be conducted under Instrument Flight Rules and are subject to ATC clearances and instructions. ATC separation is provided to all aircraft. All aircraft operating in Class A airspace must be equipped with a transponder and automatic pressure altitude reporting equipment. Class A airspace will be designated from the base of all high level controlled airspace up to and including FL600.

Class B Airspace is designated where an need exists to provide air traffic control service to IFR and to control VFR aircraft. Operations may be conducted under IFR or VFR. All aircraft are subject to ATC clearances and instructions. ATC separation is provided to all aircraft. All low level controlled airspace above 12 500 feet ASL or at and above the MEA, whichever is higher, up to but not including 18 000 feet ASL will be Class B airspace. Control zones and associated terminal control areas may also be classified as Class B airspace. No person shall operate an aircraft in Class B controlled airspace in VFR flight unless the aircraft is equipped with radio communication equipment capable of two-way communication with the appropriate ATS facility, radio navigation equipment capable of using navigation facilities to enable the aircraft to be operated in accordance with the flight plan, a transponder and automatic pressure altitude reporting equipment, a continuous listening watch is maintained by a flight crew member on a radio frequency assigned by ATC, except as otherwise authorized by ATC, when the aircraft is over a reporting point a position report is transmitted to the appropriate unit or, when so directed by ATC, to an FSS; and the aircraft is operated in VMC at all times. A person operating an aircraft on a VFR flight in Class B airspace shall operate the aircraft in VMC at all times.

Class C airspace is a controlled airspace within which both IFR and VFR flights are permitted, but VFR flights require a clearance from ATC to enter. ATC separation is provided between all aircraft operating under IFR and, as necessary to resolve possible conflicts, between VFR and IFR aircraft. Aircraft will be provided with traffic information. Airspace classified as Class C becomes Class E airspace when the appropriate ATC unit is not in operation. Terminal control areas and associated control zones may be classified as Class C airspace. A person operating an aircraft in VFR flight in Class C airspace shall ensure that the aircraft is equipped with radio communication equipment capable of two-way communication with the appropriate ATC unit, a transponder and automatic pressure altitude reporting equipment; and a continuous listening watch is maintained by a flight crew member on a radio frequency assigned by ATC. A person wishing to operate an aircraft that is not equipped with functioning communication and transponder equipment for VFR flight in Class C airspace may, during daylight hours and in VMC, enter Class C airspace provided that permission to enter and to operate within the airspace is obtained from ATC prior to the operation being conducted.

Class D airspace is a controlled airspace within which both IFR and VFR flights are permitted, but VFR flights must establish two-way communication with the appropriate ATC agency prior to entering the airspace. ATC separation is provided only to IFR aircraft. Aircraft will be provided with traffic information. Equipment and workload permitting, conflict resolution will be provided between VFR and IFR aircraft, and upon request between VFR aircraft. Airspace classified as Class D becomes Class E airspace when the appropriate ATC unit is not in operation. A terminal control area and associated control zone could be classified as Class D airspace. A person operating an aircraft in VFR flight in Class D airspace shall ensure that the aircraft is equipped with radio communication equipment capable of two-way communication with the appropriate ATC unit, where the Class D airspace is specified as Transponder Airspace, a transponder and automatic pressure altitude reporting equipment, and a continuous listening watch is maintained by a flight crew member on a radio frequency assigned by ATC. A person operating an aircraft in VFR flight that is not equipped with the required radio communication equipment may, during daylight hours in VMC, enter Class D airspace provided that permission to enter is obtained from the appropriate ATC unit prior to operating within the airspace.

Class E airspace is designated where an operational need exists for controlled airspace but does not meet the requirements for Class A, B, C, or D. Operations may be conducted under IFR or VFR. ATC separation is provided only to aircraft operating under IFR. There are no special requirements for VFR. Aircraft are required to be equipped with a transponder and automatic pressure altitude equipment to operate in Class E airspace that is specified as transponder airspace. Low level airways, control area extensions, transition areas, or control zones established without an operating control tower may be classified as Class E airspace.

Class F airspace is airspace of defined dimensions within which activities must be confined because of their nature and (or) within which limitations may be imposed upon aircraft operations that are not a part of those activities. Special use airspace may be classified as Class F advisory, or as Class F restricted, and can be controlled airspace, uncontrolled airspace, or a combination of both. An advisory area, for example, may have its base in uncontrolled airspace and its CAP in controlled airspace. The significance, in this instance, is that the weather minima would be different in the controlled and uncontrolled portions. When areas of Class F airspace are inactive, they will assume the rules of the appropriate surrounding airspace. Class F airspace shall be designated in the Designated Airspace Handbook (TP 1820E) in accordance with the Airspace Regulations, and shall be published on the appropriate aeronautical charts.

Class G airspace is airspace that has not been designated Class A, B, C, D, E or F and within which ATC has neither the authority or responsibility for exercising control over air traffic. However, ATS units do provide flight information and alerting services. The alerting service will automatically alert search and rescue authorities once an aircraft becomes overdue which is normally determined from data contained in the flight plan or flight itinerary. In effect, Class G is all uncontrolled domestic airspace. Low level air routes are contained within Class G airspace. They are basically the same as a low level airway except that they extend upwards from the surface of the earth and are not controlled. The lateral dimensions are identical to that for a low level airway.